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Britain in the late 1950s, a country boosted by a global economic boom, finally emerging from post-war austerity. Throughout the decade, however, Cold War tensions between the USA and the Soviet Union had escalated and Britain had entered the fray to become only the third nation to develop nuclear weapons. This led to the formation of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), a group headed by Anglican priest John Collins and the philosopher Bertrand Russell. Attracting support from across a broad spectrum of the public, a march was organised from London to the atomic weapons plant near the village of Aldermaston in Berkshire, a peaceful protest involving people of all ages; united in their horror at finding themselves living in the shadow of the bomb and in their fear for the future of mankind. So, from Trafalgar Square on Good Friday 1958, in dismal weather, they marched to a soundtrack of folk songs and jazz; the protest songs of Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, Fred and Betty Dallas and John Brunner, complemented by the revivalist New Orleans style of Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band and standards popularised by such British jazz giants of the era as Chris Barber, Ottilie Patterson, Humphrey Lyttelton, Kenny Ball and Acker Bilk. Jeff Nuttall, in Bomb Culture: "The Aldermaston March numbers were vast, by far the largest ever for political / humanitarian aims. Teenagers among them created a carnival of optimism. It was this wild public festival spirit that spread the CND symbol through the jazz clubs and secondary schools in an incredibly short time. Protest was associated with festivity. There was a new feeling of license granted by the obvious humanitarian attitude of the ravers themselves. "
Britain in the late 1950s, a country boosted by a global economic boom, finally emerging from post-war austerity. Throughout the decade, however, Cold War tensions between the USA and the Soviet Union had escalated and Britain had entered the fray to become only the third nation to develop nuclear weapons. This led to the formation of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), a group headed by Anglican priest John Collins and the philosopher Bertrand Russell. Attracting support from across a broad spectrum of the public, a march was organised from London to the atomic weapons plant near the village of Aldermaston in Berkshire, a peaceful protest involving people of all ages; united in their horror at finding themselves living in the shadow of the bomb and in their fear for the future of mankind. So, from Trafalgar Square on Good Friday 1958, in dismal weather, they marched to a soundtrack of folk songs and jazz; the protest songs of Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, Fred and Betty Dallas and John Brunner, complemented by the revivalist New Orleans style of Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band and standards popularised by such British jazz giants of the era as Chris Barber, Ottilie Patterson, Humphrey Lyttelton, Kenny Ball and Acker Bilk. Jeff Nuttall, in Bomb Culture: "The Aldermaston March numbers were vast, by far the largest ever for political / humanitarian aims. Teenagers among them created a carnival of optimism. It was this wild public festival spirit that spread the CND symbol through the jazz clubs and secondary schools in an incredibly short time. Protest was associated with festivity. There was a new feeling of license granted by the obvious humanitarian attitude of the ravers themselves. "
5013929336339

Details

Format: CD
Label: EL RECORDS
Rel. Date: 06/24/2022
UPC: 5013929336339

Ban The Bomb: Music Of Aldermaston Anti-Nuclear
Artist: Ban The Bomb: Music Of Aldermaston Anti-Nuclear
Format: CD
New: Available $26.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Interviewed at Ban the Bomb Rally-Bertrand Russell
2. Ewan MacColl and Betty Seeger-March with Us Today
3. Ewan MacColl and Betty Seeger-Brother Won't You Join in the Line?
4. Ewan MacColl and Betty Seeger-The Crooked Cross
5. Ewan MacColl and Betty Seegerthere's Better Things for You
6. Ewan MacColl and Betty Seeger-The Crow on the Cradle
7. Ewan MacColl, Peggy Seeger and Jack Elliott - Brother Won't You Join in the Line?
8. Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger - the Crooked Cross
9. Fred and Betty Dallas - Strontium 90
10. Fred and Betty Dallas - Hey Little Man
11. Fred Dallas - Doomsday Blues (Sung in the Film, March to Aldermaston)
12. Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger - the Ballad of the Five Fingers
13. Peggy Seeger - There Are Better Things to Do
14. The London Youth Choir - the H-Bomb's Thunder
15. The London Youth Choir - Song of Hiroshima
16. The London Youth Choir - Hoist the Window
17. Ron Fielder, Ray Edwards and Members of the Robin Hood Singers - That Bomb Has Got to Go
18. Margaret McKeown - the Dove
19. The London Youth Choir - the Family of Man
20. Chris Barber's Jazz Band with Ottilie Patterson-When the Saints Go Marching in
21. Chris Barber's Jazz Band-Sweet Georgia Brown
22. Chris Barber's Jazz Band-High Society
23. Chris Barber's Jazz Band with Ottilie Patterson-Down By the Riverside
24. Chris Barber's Jazz Band with Ottilie Patterson-Just a Closer Walk with Thee
25. George Melly with Mick Mulligan's Band -Magnolia
26. Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band-Blaze Away
27. Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band-Under the Double Eagle
28. Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band-C.R.E. March
29. Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band-El Abanico
30. Sheila Hancock and Sydney Carter-Coming Down from Aldermaston
31. Ken Colyer's Jazzmeneaster Parade
32. Ken Colyer's Jazzmenthe Original Tuxedo Rag
33. Ken Colyer's Jazzmenisle of Capri
34. Humphrey Lyttelton and His Bandice Cream
35. Humphrey Lyttelton and His Bandthe Onions
36. Humphrey Lyttelton and His Bandchristopher Columbus
37. The Alberts-Morse Code Melody
38. The Alberts-Sleepy Valley
39. Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band-Isle of Capri
40. Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band-Panama Rag
41. Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band-Tiger Rag
42. Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band-Gettysburg March
43. Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band-Over in Gloryland
44. Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band-Just a Closer Walk with Thee
45. Kenny Ball and His Jazzmen-Breezin' Along with the Breeze
46. Kenny Ball and His Jazzmen-Riverboat Shuffle
47. Kenny Ball and His Jazzmen1919 Rag
48. George Melly with Mick Mulligan and His Band-I'm a Ding Dong Daddy
49. George Melly with Mick Mulligan's Magnolia Jazz Band-There'll Be Some Changes Made
50. George Melly with Mick Mulligan's Magnolia Jazz Bandmama Don't Allow
51. Chris Barber's Jazz Band-Everybody Loves My Baby
52. Chris Barber's Jazz Band-Didn't He Ramble
53. Chris Barber's Jazz and Blues Band-Just a Little While to Stay Here

More Info:

Britain in the late 1950s, a country boosted by a global economic boom, finally emerging from post-war austerity. Throughout the decade, however, Cold War tensions between the USA and the Soviet Union had escalated and Britain had entered the fray to become only the third nation to develop nuclear weapons. This led to the formation of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), a group headed by Anglican priest John Collins and the philosopher Bertrand Russell. Attracting support from across a broad spectrum of the public, a march was organised from London to the atomic weapons plant near the village of Aldermaston in Berkshire, a peaceful protest involving people of all ages; united in their horror at finding themselves living in the shadow of the bomb and in their fear for the future of mankind. So, from Trafalgar Square on Good Friday 1958, in dismal weather, they marched to a soundtrack of folk songs and jazz; the protest songs of Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, Fred and Betty Dallas and John Brunner, complemented by the revivalist New Orleans style of Ken Colyer's Omega Brass Band and standards popularised by such British jazz giants of the era as Chris Barber, Ottilie Patterson, Humphrey Lyttelton, Kenny Ball and Acker Bilk. Jeff Nuttall, in Bomb Culture: "The Aldermaston March numbers were vast, by far the largest ever for political / humanitarian aims. Teenagers among them created a carnival of optimism. It was this wild public festival spirit that spread the CND symbol through the jazz clubs and secondary schools in an incredibly short time. Protest was associated with festivity. There was a new feeling of license granted by the obvious humanitarian attitude of the ravers themselves. "
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